Tuesday, December 14, 2010

The "No Labels" crowd would also like to have a word


Awwww... Gibbsy doesn't appreciate Olby's uncivil tone.

White House press secretary Robert Gibbs advised the liberal commenter Keith Olbermann on Monday to refrain from using comparisons to Nazi Germany after the MSNBC host likened President Obama’s deal on tax cuts to Nazi appeasement.

“Whenever you compare anything to what the Nazis did, if you ever get to that point in your speech, stop, because nothing does, and hopefully, God willing, nothing ever will,” Gibbs told reporters.


Besides being uncivil, it was downright bizarre. Here's Olby from last week:

“I will confess I won’t fight if anyone wants to draw a comparison between what you’ve done with our domestic policies of our day to what Neville Chamberlain did with the domestic policies of his,” says Olbermann.

The reference is to Neville Chamberlain who, as Prime Minister of Great Britain, infamously cut a deal with Hitler (that Hitler subsequently broke to the surprise of nobody except Chamberlain) and proclaimed “peace in our time.”


So it was Neville Chamberlain's tax policies that led to the German invasion of Poland?

After all these years...



Exit question: How far apart on the incivility meter are hostage-takers and Nazis?

5 comments:

Harrison said...

Can you believe Olbermann and Coulter used to date? Keith is a windbag looking for a gust to sustain him.

Dean said...

Was it Olbermann or Maher? Possibly both?

drozz said...

first rule in liberal arguments: call someone a nazi, no matter how unrelated. nazis make headlines.

if that doesn't work, pull out the racism deck.

also hope nobody remembers that national socialism is/was a tenet of the left, or that the dems were all for slavery and segregation.

Harrison said...

I saw this clip on Red Eye about this subject... check it out pretty funny:

http://www.thehopeforamerica.com/play.php?id=6319

SEO London said...

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